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As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.

Coconut Grove
Coral Gables
Cutler Bay
Doral
Key Biscayne
Miami Beach
Miami
Palmetto Bay
Pinecrest
South Miami

New Listing in High Pines Miami

Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 in Our Featured Lisitngs, South Miami Real Estate | 0 comments

7236 SW 54 CT High Pines Miami

7236 SW 54th CT, High Pines Miami

NEW CONSTRUCTION – Completion approximately 60 days.

5 Bedrooms

5.5 Baths

4,751 Sq Ft Living Space

9,375 Sq Ft Lot Size

 

New Construction in sought after High Pines. Contemporary clean line in the Key West genre, one of a kind!

CBS – concrete second story – metal roof – luxury finishes throughout. Quality abounds: 10 FT plus ceilings throughout, solid doors, exclusive porcelain tile with the appearance of light natural wood, crown moldings, natural limestone used in the front entrance. Five bedrooms – five and a half baths, no detail large or small has been overlooked.

The massive second story master suite enjoys dream closets the size of rooms, a luxurious master bath with a free standing show piece tub as well as a private balcony to enjoy the stars.

The second floor has 3 separate children’s bedrooms all with ensuite bathrooms boasting European glass showers and the bedrooms enjoy an open light ambiance with a balcony running the entire front of the home.

A state of the art chef’s kitchen! Boasting a bar counter with a neolith stone water fall counter top, solid wood maple cabinets, floor to ceiling with shaker fronts. Open glass display areas, the newest of lighting, all Thermador appliances, gas cooking, huge double ovens, wine cooler…

The fifth bedroom is downstairs with an ensuite bath and perfect for guests/library.

Relax around the large statement pool surrounded by shelstone and lush tropical foliage. Amazing! Enjoy your own private resort – the ambiance of High Pines – and the quaint village of South Miami.

7236 SW 54 CT High Pines Miami

7236 SW 54 CT High Pines Miami

As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.

Miami Coconut Grove Grows from Birkenstocks to Billionaires

Posted by on Feb 6, 2016 in Coconut Grove Real Estate | 0 comments

After years of losing luxury buyers and developers to South Beach and Downtown, the Miami Coconut Grove enclave is attracting record-setting condo projects

The village of Miami Coconut Grove is stepping out of Miami Beach’s shadow, with ambitious condo projects and a wave of new construction.

Article from the Wall Street Journal By Stefanos Chen

miami coconut grovePeacocks amble down the side streets. The vegetation has an overgrown, jungle-like quality. Hippies once camped out here in vacant lots and public parks. And Coconut Grove—Miami’s groovy, Birkenstock-loving village—is now commanding some of the highest prices in the city, competing with slicker neighbors like Miami Beach.

With tight inventory and a spate of ambitious condo projects, the Grove has attracted a number of high profile residents in recent years, including actor Christian Slater, mega-developer Jorge Pérez, Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra and health care tycoon Mike Fernandez, according to public records and real-estate agents.

Prices for some units in Park Grove’s under-construction towers are expected to top $1,900 a square foot—a city of Miami record. Coconut Grove’s priciest home, a historic estate listed for $47.5 million, is likely to be torn down as the value really lies in its 6.9 acres, agents say.

miami coconut groveIt could be a challenge for the subtropical enclave, known for its wild flora, to keep its hippie roots intact. Sandy Dufay, a retired health care company founder, is selling her 1928 waterfront villa for $3.795 million, as she’s conducting the renovation of a newer home a few blocks away.

Listing agent Mercedes Hernandez with Avatar Real Estate Services says homes on valuable waterfront lots, like Ms. Dufay’s, are dwindling because developers are tearing them down to build larger modern spreads that maximize their return. Down the block, a home on a similar lot was demolished to create a 9,800-square-foot spec house listed for almost $8 million—more than double the price of Ms. Dufay’s home.

“There’s hardly a street that hasn’t had something knocked down” for redevelopment, says Ms. Dufay, who hopes her future buyer will keep her home intact.

Located south of the downtown area, the 5.6-square-mile village of about 20,000 people predates the founding of Miami, which annexed the area in 1925. Unlike nearby Miami Beach, Coconut Grove has no sandy beaches or direct oceanfront. In the 1950s and ‘60s, beatniks and hippies were nonetheless drawn to the area’s walkable core and eclectic housing, and it has retained a bohemian spirit since, according to Paul George, a professor at Miami Dade College.

miami coconut groveWinding side streets and lush vegetation recall an older Grove, established by English and Bahamian settlers, where Mediterranean villas meet colorful timber-frame conch houses. On some blocks, you might spot a muster of peacocks dawdling in the road.

“It’s different than the rest of the city—it isn’t manicured like other neighborhoods,” said Bernardo Fort-Brescia, the co-founder of design firm Arquitectonica and a longtime resident. He lives with his family in a modern waterfront home in a junglelike private community thick with trees.

Mr. Pérez, the billionaire developer and founder of Related Group, lives down the road in a 10,000-square-foot Venetian-style palazzo. Nearby is Jonathan Lewis, an investor and son of the late Progressive Insurance PGR 1.73 % chairman, Peter Lewis, according to records, as well as Carlos Migoya, the CEO of Jackson Health System (and occasional tennis partner to Mr. Pérez, the developer says).

The spirit persists in the zoning code, which forbids adjacent homes to be exactly alike and mandates that removal of historic trees, like the village’s prized banyans and oaks, must be cleared by the city, says Luciana Gonzalez, assistant director of planning and zoning.

When high-end retail and residential development picked up in nearby Miami Beach and surrounding areas in the late 1990s, the Grove was largely left out, said Peter Zalewski, founder of condo-data company Cranespotters. “The only people you were left with were the hippies,” says Mr. Zalewski, who adds that top-flight buyers looked to beachfront communities.

miami coconut groveThat began to change in 2013, when sales started at the Grove at Grand Bay, two towers designed by Bjarke Ingels, who is now designing New York’s Two World Trade Center. Prices ranged from about $3 million to $9 million, with a roughly 14,000-square-foot penthouse asking $28 million. It was the first new high-end condo project to hit the Grove since about 2006 and all 98 units have sold, according to David Martin, the president of the developer, Terra Group. The towers will be finished in roughly eight months.

Now Terra Group, along with Related Group, is building Park Grove, the nearby three-tower complex designed by well-known architect Rem Koolhaas and his firm OMA. The first two towers will be completed around winter 2017, but 95% of the units, priced from $600,000 to $5 million, have sold, said Pietro Belmonte of Douglas Elliman.

The final and most expensive tower, slated for completion in 2018, will have 54 units ranging from a $4 million three-bedroom to an $8 million apartment with five bedrooms, 6½ baths and a wraparound balcony. That translates to over $1,900 a square foot for some units. Related’s Mr. Pérez says he will personally curate a multimillion-dollar collection of contemporary art pieces and installations for Park Grove, including sculptures from Jaume Plensa and Richard Serra.

Buyers include Mr. Fernandez, founder of MBF Healthcare Partners, and Brazilian race car driver Emerson Fittipaldi. Mr. Fittipaldi, 68, says he is moving his family, along with a collection of Grand Prix race cars, from nearby Key Biscayne. He says he bought a 3,000-square-foot unit for $4.5 million at the new tower for the same reason many locals will: top-rated schools like Ransom Everglades, where tuition costs $34,550 a year.

Mr. Fernandez, 63, says he bought a two-story, 5,000-square-foot apartment with a private pool, as well as a two-bedroom unit for his daughter, for a total of roughly $10 million. “If I was 17, I would probably go to South Beach,” he says. “But Coconut Grove has a maturity to it that is [both] calm and exciting.” He plans to move from his current residence in nearby Coral Gables.

The housing market has risen rapidly in the last few years, says Michael Light of Miami Luxury Homes. For publicly listed condos and homes, the median sales price in the Grove was $675,000 in 2015, up 17.5% from 2014. Last year, NBA star LeBron James sold his roughly 12,000-square-foot home in the Grove for $13.4 million, according to public records—one of the most expensive home sales in the village.

Nelson Gonzalez of EWM Realtors is listing La Brisa, the 6.9-acre estate with a circa 1920 mansion and over 200 feet of bay frontage. The only interest so far has come from developers looking to bulldoze and subdivide the land, Mr. Gonzalez says.

“Sometimes they go down so fast, I forget what was there” said historian Arva Moore Parks about the surge of demolitions. She recently campaigned to prevent a developer from leveling a historic Mediterranean home. According to the zoning department, there were about 45 requests for residential demolition in 2014, and most were approved. In 2015, there were 70.

Mr. Fort-Brescia has a few words of advice for newcomers looking to change the village. “You can’t let success take it over, because before you know it, we’re just like everybody else.”

As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.

15 Miami Cities and Neighborhoods

Posted by on Feb 5, 2016 in Miami Real Estate | 0 comments

The stories behind the names of 15 Miami cities and neighborhoods

Article from the Miami New Times by Kyle Munzenrieder

 

Compared to many American cities, Miami has a relatively short history. Much of that history involves real-estate development booms and busts. The result is that many of the area’s city and neighborhood names are either shockingly obvious, highly descriptive, or simply pretty and marketable. (Buena Vista, for example, doesn’t have a view any more beautiful than many other neighborhoods, but it sure sounds good.)

Some others, however, have a more interesting backstory. Here are a few:

Aventura
Some people oddly assume the city’s name comes from the mall, but that’s not the case. Don Soffer, one of the original developers of the area, says he chose the name “Aventura” in 1968, 15 years before the mall opened. One version of the story goes that the name was inspired when one developer involved in the project remarked to another: “What an adventure this will be.” The word “aventura” is Spanish for “adventure.”

Oh, Soffer also once said the correct pronunciation is “Aven-TOUR-a,” although many people pronounce it “Aven-CHUR-a.”

miami cities

Bal Harbour
This village was originally called Bay Harbour, but the city wanted to let everyone know the town wasn’t on just a bay; it was on an ocean too. So they came up with the word “Bal” as something of a combination of the words “bay” and “Atlantic.”

miami cities

Brickell
This is Miami History 101 here: The neighborhood is named for William and Mary Brickell, who, along with Julia Tuttle, played a major part in founding Miami.

miami cities

Coral Gables
Coral Gables founder George Merrick came to the area as a boy when his father moved the family here at the turn of the century. The home the family lived in had gables (i.e., the term for triangular wall under a roof’s pitch) made of limestone — hence “Coral Gables.” At least according to local legend, that’s how he chose the name. His family’s home is still operated by the city as a historical site.

 

miami cities

Doral
Alfred and Doris Kaskel developed the area and simply decided to combine their first names. Sounds slightly better than Kaskel, Florida.

miami cities

Fontainebleau
Yes, the mainland neighborhood takes its name from the famed Miami Beach resort. In 1970, Ben Novack, the Fontainebleau’s original owner, grew jealous of Doris and Alfred Kaskel’s plans in Doral and wanted to create his own planned golf course, resort, and community. It was to be known as Fontainebleau Park. Novack, however, soon fell into financial problems (and the Fontainebleau Park investment headache would play a part in the hotel’s foreclosure in 1977). The company Trafalgar Developers would go on to develop the community under the “Fontainebleau” name, but no link to the famed hotel would ever be mentioned in press or promotional materials when the community opened in the ’70s.

The Fontainebleau hotel, by the way, takes its name from a castle in France.

Homestead
The city takes its name from the Homestead Acts of the late 1800s in which the federal government basically gave land to individuals as a way to address inequality.

Kendall
A guy named Henry John Broughton Kendall managed this area when a land company bought it from the State of Florida in the 1880s.

Miami
Miami was named after the Miami River. The river got its name because it flows from Lake Okeechobee, which was at one point called the Lake of Mayaimi.
Oh, and originally, residents wanted to name the town “Flagler” after Henry Flagler.

miami real estate

Omni
In a time when mixed-used megaprojects are popping up in Miami left and right, the Omni Mall might not seem like much of a big deal. But when the Omni Mall & Hotel opened in 1977, it was the biggest game in town. The mall featured a multilevel department store, the third Givenchy store in the United States, movie theaters, and even a mini theme park. The hotel, meanwhile, was the first hotel to be built in Miami-Dade in 11 years and the first to be built off of Miami Beach in 20 years. It was a huge deal for the City of Miami.

The development group behind the Omni used “Omni” to brand other hotels and shopping areas in other cities. So it isn’t unique to Miami, but local just decided to use it as a neighborhood name as well. The hotel is now a Hilton, and the mall closed in 2000, but the neighborhood name has stuck.

Perrine
The area is named for Henry Perrine, a tropical-plant enthusiast who ended up being killed by Seminole Indians in 1840.

Redland
Red clay used to be prevalent in this South Miami-Dade farming area, but residents decided to go with the singular “Redland” so the area wouldn’t be confused with Redlands, California.

The Roads
Miami is laid out in a grid system of streets and avenues, but in 1920, Mary Brickell wanted to carve out a pedestrian-friendly residential neighborhood with streets that ran at a diagonal to the main grid. Originally dubbed “Biscayne Hammocks,” the area’s diagonal streets were called “roads,” and that’s the name that stuck.

miami cities

Tamiami
This area is named after the Tamiami Trail, which connects Tampa to Miami. “Tamiami”: “Tampa-Miami.”
Also, Flagami gets its name from the meeting of Flagler Street and Tamiami Trail, which makes it a mixed-up mess of three separate, originally unrelated words.

Wynwood
Wynwood’s name seems to be a case of “it just sounded pretty,” but it’s worth noting that the area was originally named Wyndwood Park. When the City of Miami built an actual park in the area, it somehow was named “Wynwood Park,” without the first “d.” Eventually, the “Park” part would drop off as well.

As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.

New Listing on Bayshore Dr Coconut Grove

Posted by on Feb 4, 2016 in Coconut Grove Real Estate, Our Featured Lisitngs | 0 comments

Bayshore Dr Coconut GroveBoutique Style Building on Bayshore Dr Coconut Grove

Asking  $300,000.00

2545 Bayshore Dr, Apt 304, Miami, FL 33133
1 Bedrooms
1 Bathrooms
543 Sq Ft
PREMIUM LOCATION S.Bayshore Dr Coconut Grove in the HEART of The GROVE, Gorgeous Updated Unit across from Monty’s. Boutique Style Building. Close to Parks, Shopping, Restaurants & Spectacular Waterfront. Unit has been renovated. Real Hardwood Flooring in main area, New Carpet in MBR, floors Soundproofed.Unit also offers Private Screened Balcony area. New Granite Kitchen Counter, New Appliances, newer AC & A Bar sitting area for Kitchen. Gated entry to building & LG Pool Area. A Must See & Rare Find in the Building & Area of Coconut Grove.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bayshore dr coconut grovebayshore dr coconut grovebayshore dr coconut grovebayshore dr coconut grovebayshore dr coconut grovebayshore dr coconut grove

As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.

Stock Market Dip May Make Jumbo Loans Even More Attractive

Posted by on Feb 3, 2016 in Miami Real Estate | 0 comments

jumbo loansJumbo Loans – Rates could drop below 4%, a boon to some borrowers

Article from the Real Deal by Dusica Sue Malesevic

The jumbo-mortgage market will likely keep its mojo in 2016 after it reached new highs last year — not even recent turbulence in global stocks can slow it down, according to industry experts.

In fact, the current dip in the global market may hold interest rates for jumbo mortgages — loans above $417,000 or more, depending on the area — below four percent for a while longer, an attractive proposition for borrowers seeking a safer investment in real estate.

The volume of mortgage loans reached an estimated $320 billion nationally in 2015, the highest market share since 2002 and a slight increase from 2014, when jumbo mortgages comprised 18 percent of the lending market, Guy Cecala, CEO and publisher of Inside Mortgage Finance, told the Wall Street Journal.

The Federal Reserve isn’t likely to raise short-term rates in the spring, said Keith Gumbinger, vice president of mortgage-rate website HSH.com. Gumbinger told the Journal that interest will probably stay below four percent due to stock market volatility.

If the central bank does raise short-term rates, it would be no more than two to three times this year, said Gumbinger. This would keep the average 30-year, fixed-rate jumbo loan around a little less than five percent. Currently, the rate is 3.875 percent. Five-year, adjustable-rate mortgages may hit four percent, he said.

Often in a down stock market, people shift assets to real estate as a safer investment, although the downturn may mean less available cash for buyers seeking to purchase expensive homes, Cecala said.

A flux in rates coupled with fear of rising home prices could stimulate home buying and current borrowers with adjustable-rate mortgages may rush to refinance.

As one of Miami’s best Real Estate Teams, you will find that we offer Experience, Professionalism, Dedication, Quick Responses and Outstanding Results. John Seidel has over 15 years’ experience selling real estate in numerous areas within Miami Dade. As a Miami native, he not only knows the areas but specializes in many Miami neighborhoods.

If you are considering buying or selling Coconut Grove real estate, Coral Gables real estate, Pinecrest real estate, Palmetto Bay real estate, Cutler Bay real estate, Key Biscayne real estate, Miami Beach real estate, High Pines real estate or South Miami real estate and want to work with an experienced team of real estate agents, feel free to contact the John Seidel Team directly at 786-488-9756 or email us at John@JohnSeidel.com today for your complementary consultation. We look forward to hearing from you.

Check back with us frequently as we are constantly posting the latest sales, statistics, and local news on Miami’s Real Estate Market.